Nurses' Attitudes towards Death and Care of the Dying Patient

Thesis
Description: 

 As the population continues to age, more patients are dying in healthcare facilities than ever before (Bercovitz et al., 2008); nurses need to be prepared to provide end-of-life care to this population. This study examines the factors that affect nurse attitudes towards death and care of the dying patients. A descriptive correlation study was concluded in an acute care hospital during February 2012. A total of 91 Registered Nurses completed a web-based survey, including Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of Dying Scale (FATCOD) and a demographic data form. The nurses working in the oncology unit, holding a master's degree, and having 5-10 years of RN experience had better attitudes toward care of the dying (p< 0.05). The demographic predictors explained 27.7% of variance in attitudes toward care of the dying. Working in medical-surgical or telemetry units was a significant negative predictor of the good attitudes (ß= -0.29, p=0.005), whereas the previous experience in dealing with dying patients and family members was a significant positive predictor of the good attitudes (ß=0.20, p=0.049). The demographic variables appear to have large influence over the attitudes toward care of the dying patients for hospital nurses. Identification of these predictors of good attitudes toward care of the dying could help generate effective strategies for improving nurses' attitudes.

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WHDL ID: 
WHDL-00006092
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